Seacourt Celebrates US Links

Students from JBU

Students from JBU

Seacourt Print Workshop has welcomed twelve visitors from the John Brown University, Arkansas to its printmaking facilities in The Centre for Contemporary Printmaking, Balloo. The ten students and two staff are spending a fortnight in Bangor learning skills in etching, lithography and relief printing.

Seacourt’s Creative Director Robert Peters said, “We have been providing half day workshops to JBU students at their Belfast base for the past four years in partnership with Art Historian, Amanda Croft. The quality of that programme has led to our current engagement of providing two weeks of intensive training to Visual Art students. Mr. Bob Martin, Associate Professor of Visual Arts with JBU, visited Seacourt last year to plan the trip. We would like to thank him and the students for travelling 4,000 miles to learn new skills at Seacourt.”

Bob Martin said, “Our student art studies group from John Brown University has had an amazing time at Seacourt Print Workshop these past two weeks. Robert Peters and the staff at Seacourt have been incredibly helpful in teaching the exciting possibilities of printmaking. The students and faculty in our group, most of which had no print experience, have been challenged to produce some excellent work, and been given the ability to learn new art-making techniques in an inspiring environment. Thanks to Seacourt for their hospitality and a great educational experience. We certainly enjoyed the Bangor area, and hope to make a return trip with a new group of students in the future!”

The connection with JBU is just one of several active links Seacourt has forged and maintained in the US. Currently Seacourt is exhibiting members’ original prints in Pyramid Atlantic Art Centre in Washington DC. An exhibition of artworks by PAAC members will be hosted in Seacourt during June. A print exchange with Arizona Print Group will see 40 artists from both areas exhibit prints at Seacourt’s gallery in The Centre for Contemporary Printmaking in September of this year. Artist exchanges are planned as a further development of the link to Arizona. Further details are available on Seacourt’s website www.seacourt-ni.org.uk/exhibitions.

Chasing the Sublime

Christine Leathem  June 7 - 28

'But in the actual phenomenal world, unity and harmony are replaced by strife or discord; the result is a conflict, a becoming and vanishing, an illusive existence.'
Neoplatonism, Plotinus

I have always felt the desire to reject the chaos of life and find that space, which I sense deep within, that honours stillness. It’s not feeling that there is something more to this world, but rather something beyond the structures we participate in. Maybe to be human, is to plainly exist and accept the perfect emptiness that lies beneath this world of layers, faces, shades and time. It’s the age-old questions: who are we, why are we here?

Drawing has always been a personal form of therapy to me. It is how I spend my free time and helps to resolve or create a place for feelings I can never find the words for. I juxtapose figurative and landscape elements and play with compositions in which negative space becomes just as important as the image area. I layer figurative drawings until they become chaotic and undefined, ghostly and fleeting in appearance. Through this additive approach to image making I explore feelings of discontent that arise through frenetic, external activity.  The negative spaces within the work act as a dichotomy to this; a calmness. Lithography offers a meditative process, from the manual graining of the stone to the direct drawing of the image that demands attentive concentration.

Leathem was born in Northern Ireland and is a graduate from Glasgow School of Art. She trained at the prestigious Tamarind Institute, New Mexico. Recent exhibitions include Symbiosis, Pyramid Atlantic Washington(2017), Bothnia Biennial, Finland (2016), Glasgow Print StudioandTrongate Theatre, Glasgow (2012).

Confusion I lithograph

Confusion I lithograph

Response Exhibition

Seacourt artists responded to a collection of photographs taken between 1902-08 of native Americans in South-West America. An exhibition of prints and photographs will be on display in Bloomfield Shopping Centre through out the summer. Further detail here

Last of the American War Chiefs

Last of the American War Chiefs

Global Patterns

An exhibition of original prints exploring the human predilection for pattern making from an International perspective.

Seacourt members where invited to take part in an exhibition exploring the above theme. From the earliest times humans have sought to create patterns visually, socially and through sound. Pattern can be seen within the broader animal world in terms of markings and plumage but the urge to externalise pattern and use it as a cultural signifier is particular to humans. It is this aspect of pattern making that participants where being asked to explore. The use of pattern in cultural artefacts such as flags or emerging through human activity as observed in maps, the built environment or socially in patterns of behaviour. Any culture or time period was open to investigation.

Environmental Baggage - Original Prints by Steph Harrison

Environmental Baggage. Steph Harrison: 2 – 28 February

Steph Harrison, untitled screen-print

Steph Harrison, untitled screen-print

Harrison’s diagnosis of MS lead her to seek an understanding of the condition through creative engagement with its pathology. The artist has sought to understand past influences which underlie the condition as she strives to cope with physical symptoms in the present. Clarifying the condition’s physical and cognitive effects help to subdue the fear of the future and promote acceptance. MS is said to be a combination of genetic and environmental factors. This new body of work consists of four elements;

Ancestral history and genetic links

The importance of sunlight.

Viruses.

The central nervous system.

The project has been a cathartic process. Continual learning and practicing of new techniques has been important for both the artist’s mental health and preserving physical capabilities.

Exhibition launches 1 February at 7.00pm in the Centre for Contemporary Printmaking, Bangor. Continues to the 28 February.

 

Mythical Creatures - original prints from Arizona Print Group. 2 Feb - 30 Mar

Wendy Willis, 'Kurma', relief

Wendy Willis, 'Kurma', relief

 "Myth must be kept alive. The people who can keep it alive are the  artists of one kind or another." 

― Joseph Campbell

 
 Mythology has provided a means to bond society, a way to transmit history, and as vessels for important lessons, morals, and rules. Myths are prevalent in every civilization worldwide and remain an inspiration for artist seeking to understand our shared humanity. 'Mythological Creatures' is an exhibition of original prints by
 members of Arizona Print Group. Utilising the vernacular of traditional and experimental printmaking the participating artists have created visual responses to this rich field of research.
 
 Developing from this exhibition will be a print exchange project between APG and Seacourt followed by artist exchange opportunities. Exhibiting artists include:Jo Andersen, Josephine Gibbs-Archer, Donna Atwood, Stu Biscoe, Kimberley Boege, Donna Carver, Ashley B. Cranney, Betsy Dally, Christine Dawdy, Brenda Diller, Norma Galindo, Linda Haas, Jennifer Henry, Karen Hymer, Eric Hodgins, Marlys Kubicek, Maria Lynam, Paulette Olive, Ann Otis, Leslie Parsons, Donn Rawlings, Susan L. Ritter, Marjorie Rogers, Jean L. Rossman, Steve Straussner, Marika Szabo, Glory Tacheenie-Campoy, Joan Thompson, Robert Wilder, Mary Lou Wills and Wendy Willis.

Interhuman Exhibition Launch

Graham, Cedar Foundation

Graham, Cedar Foundation

Seacourt print exhibition challenges perceptions of illness and disability

A special exhibition challenging perceptions of those living with illness or a disability has opened at Bloomfield Shopping Centre.  Developed by Seacourt Print Workshop, which is funded by the Arts Council of Northern Ireland, 70 original prints have been created by participants in an innovative community engagement project called Interhuman.

The Interhuman exhibition marks the completion of the first year of a two-year initiative run by the Seacourt Print Workshop with funding from two of the UK’s most prestigious trusts, the Esmée Fairbairn Foundation and the Paul Hamlyn Foundation. Interhuman sets out to bring people from marginalised groups together through a common enjoyment of printmaking, challenging the perception of people as defined by their illness or medical condition.

The initiative builds on Seacourt’s long-held commitment to actively engage with people with a wide range of disabilities and health support needs, using printmaking as an effective social tool for creating positive, inclusive, experiences for everyone.

In addition to learning new confidence-building skills and developing new interests in life, the participants are taking part in important research into the impact of the arts on people’s wellbeing. This research involves eleven key support groups and agencies in Northern Ireland, including Action Mental Health, International Women in North Down, The Cedar Foundation, Positive Futures and Jigsaw NI.

Robert Peters, Creative Director Seacourt Print Workshop, commented: “Seacourt’s expanding engagement programme strives to make art socially relevant to the wider community.  Our experience is that the arts are particularly good at bringing people from all walks of life together in shared activity. Printmaking is uniquely accessible for everyone, irrespective of ability or experience. As participants develop new skills their confidence grows and their creativity blossoms conferring a real sense of personal achievement. Through our Interhuman project we hope to contribute to the growing body of evidence supporting the benefits of the arts to people’s wellbeing.”

Noírín McKinney, Director of Arts Development at the Arts Council of Northern Ireland and Seacourt Print Workshop’s principal funder, said: “The Arts Council is committed, through our funding, to the principle that everyone in society has the right to enjoy the benefits of the arts. Seacourt Print Workshop’s engagement programmes, such as the Interhuman project, are tremendous demonstrations of this principle in action, opening pathways into printmaking for people from all backgrounds and abilities. We are delighted to support Seacourt Print Workshop as it continues deliver the best possible participatory experiences for everyone.”

The Interhuman exhibition will continue at Bloomfield shopping centre until January 6th 2017.

Notes to editors:

Groups participating the in Interhuman Exhibition include: International Women in North Down, Positive Futures, The Link, Action Mental Health, Cranley Lodge, The Cedar Foundation, Jigsaw NI, AGEnda, Age North Down and Ards, Bangor Men’s Shed and Bangor Art Projects. 

Additional support for those already keen to keep printing has been offered through funding from the Halifax Foundation.

Seacourt Print Workshop is a universally accessible, fine-art print facility providing access to the widest range of printmaking techniques in Ireland. In addition to being an artists’ resource with a gallery space, Seacourt Print Workshop runs a wide range of public classes and engagement programmes. It is based at The Centre for Contemporary Printmaking in Dunlop Industrial Estate, Bangor. It is Email: info@seacourt-ni.org.uk or Tel: 028 9146 0595. Website: http://www.seacourt-ni.org.uk/

Symbiosis - Double Vision

Enzo Minarro

Enzo Minarro

This exhibition presents symbiotic relationships explored through original printmaking as part of a regional Festival in Finland. The exhibition will be hosted by Cultural Centre Vanha Paukku, Lapua during August. This will be part of the  Bothnia Biennial, a region wide festival. Seacourt's participation was made possible through an ongoing exchange link with  Vanha Paukku

Eden's Blueprint at the International Airport

Robbie Bower

Robbie Bower

Eden's Blueprint, an exhibition of original prints inspired by the historic site of Antrim Castle, is now on diplay in the departures area of Belfast International Airport. This partnership project is with Clotworthy House Art Centre in Antrim. Antrim Castle Gardens are of the most unique and historically intact gardens in the UK and throughout Ireland. The former seat of the Skeffington family, Viscounts Massereene and Ferrard, Antrim Castle occupied its imposing setting on the banks of the Sixmilewater River since 1610. The family began laying out the gardens in the 17th century. While the castle itself was destroyed by fire in 1922 the principal Anglo-Dutch water features of the gardens, though somewhat neglected, have remained largely intact. These unique historic gardens, located close to Antrim town centre, recently underwent a major programme of works to restore many of the key features dating back to the late 17th century. The Heritage Lottery Fund’s recognition of Antrim Castle Garden’s historical significance provided the impetus for Antrim Borough Council to undertake what was the biggest garden restoration project seen in Northern Ireland. The exhibition continues through November.

This exhibition will also be on display in the Offices of the First and Deputy First Minister, Brussels from September 2016 through to March 2017

Interhuman I Exhibition

This exhibition presents over 90 original prints created by participants in a comunity engagement project called Interhuman

Interhuman is a two year project funded by the Esmee Fairbairn Foundation and the Paul Hamlyn Foundation. During year one participant were introduced to new skills in printmaking and have also been taking part in a research programme to ascertain if impact on wellbeing can be measured. In year two the participants will be brought together in mixed groups based on their enjoyment of making art as opposed to being corralled under socially expedient definitions tied to disability or ethnic origin.  Additional support for those already keen to keep printing has been offered through funding from the Halifax Foundation.

 Participating groups include –

International Women, Positive Futures, The Link, Action Mental Health, Cranley Lodge, The Cedar Foundation, Jigsaw NI, AGEnda, NDCN, Bangor Men’s Shed and Bangor Art Projects. The artwork created by the participating groups has been exceptional, irrespective of age or ability.

The exhibition launches on the 15th of September and runs to the 30th. The show will then move to Bloomfield Shopping Centre until the 17th of November.

 

Seacourt Open Studio Event 2016

Prize winner Shauna McGowan. Image courtesy of the artists

Prize winner Shauna McGowan. Image courtesy of the artists

During August Seacourt: The Centre for Contemporary Printmaking will be offering an opportunity to learn more about original printmaking. The annual Open Studio event provides demonstrations in a range of printmaking techniques alongside exhibitions and a chance to speak directly to artists about their creative process.

The event runs from the 1st to the 14th August and access is available 9.30 – 4.30 each day including Saturdays and Sundays. This year there will be exhibitions by textile artists Shauna McGowan and Katie Brown. Both are past recipients of Craft NI’s making it Programme and are highly respected within their field. Shauna recently won 1st place at the RDS National Craft Awards in the Emerging Leatherwork Category whilst Katie was awarded the Bronze Award in the Fashion & Accessories in the 2016 Etsy Awards. Their exhibition will be accompanied by the work of three artists from Finland. Susanna Shearman, Christine Jalio & Mervi Viitajylha visited Seacourt earlier this year and spent time collecting stories and artefacts relating to loss and grieving from local people. Their collaborative installation is a response to those stories.

Robert Peters, Creative Director of Seacourt said, “Our Open Studio event is a great introduction to the world of original printmaking. The word ‘print’ can be deceptive as it conjures up the posters that can be bought in IKEA or Homebase. Original prints are hand worked using techniques that may have a history of 500 years or at the edge of new technological developments. To understand the difference you really need to see the laborious processes and artistic skill involved. Our print demonstrations take place at 2.00pm each day except Mondays and will offer a real insight into the methods involved. Seacourt has established itself as a world-class organisation in a universally accessible facility. Each year we have artists from across the world visit to create their art here in Bangor. At the start of August local people can drop in to discover why. They won’t be disappointed.”

Full programme available at http://www.seacourt-ni.org.uk/open-studio

Teppong Hongsrimuang and Jakkee Kongkaew Exhibition

Jakkee Kongkaew, woodcut

Jakkee Kongkaew, woodcut

9th June - 22nd July 2016

This is the first UK exhibition by Thai artists Teppong Hongsrimuang and Jakkee Kongkaew. Both artists create large scale woodcuts focusing on detailed observations of everyday life and landscape. Hongsrimuang has won numerous awards for his social realist depictions of temporary shacks that house construction workers on building sites. He seeks to reveal the labourer camp’s human stories through the careful rendering of objects which reveal the cultural origin of the workers, many of whom travel from the countryside to find employment. Utilising only tone Hongsrimuang manages to give the corrugated tin shacks a monumental quality, reflective of his respect for the workers who live in them.

Jakkee Kongkaew’s approach to woodcut is informed by master printer Prayat Pongdam who’s works explored nature, folk cultures and the Thai rural spirit. For Kongkaew each minute detail contains within it a beauty reflective of the whole. This is illustrated in ‘The Aesthetic of a Cliff’. These cliffs can be seen in almost every Thailand area and are a sign that the stone mining industry has scarred and disfigured the rock surface through the practice of detonated explosions. This mining feeds the construction industry’s appetite for earth materials to meet the demands of the expansive population growth and economic development.

Kongkaew states, “The resources from nature were always brought to make life more comfortable and better for humans. Yet humans forget the importance of nature and how we totally depend on it like a child depends on its mother. In my eyes, the cliffs are always full of the beauty of harmony and texture within the layers of stone. I see a miracle of nature in that the cliff reveals the deep history of the past. I like to engrave the smallest lines by the smallest tool, making a pattern and texture from the cliff in a semi-abstract style. Finally, I want my audiences to realise the importance of nature and saving the natural resources.”

Teppong Hongsrimuang obtained a B.F.A from the Faculty of Fine Arts Printmaking at Chiang Mai University. Exhibitions include The 30th Exhibition of Contemporary Art by Young Artists (2013), The 1st Exhibition BAM cultural heritage of Lanna (2013), The 6th Group Exhibition “Print as Prints”(2013), The 3rd White Elephant Art Award “My Homeland” (2014) and International Print Biennial Łódź, Poland (2016). Awards include - Support Award: The 30th Exhibition of Contemporary Art by Young Artists (2014) - honoured for outstanding in the field of printmaking. Faculty of Fine Arts; Winner of the contest: The 1st Exhibition BAM cultural heritage of Lanna (2014) - Award Contest: Sriracha livable City (2014); 2nd Prize (Silver Medal) The 31st Exhibition of Contemporary Art by Young Artists (2015) Support Award of Krung Thai Bank: The 60th National Exhibition of Art Thailand (2015), Winner of the contest: The 2st Exhibition BAM cultural heritage of Lanna (2015). Support Award of Krung Thai Bank: The 61th National Exhibition of Art Thailand (2016)

Jakkee Kongkaew studied B.F.A. in Printmaking, Faculty of Fine and Applied Arts, Chiang Mai University. He is currently studying for an M.F.A. in Visual Arts (Printmaking), Faculty of Painting, Sculpture and Graphic Arts, Silpakorn University. He has been awarded the Silver Medal Award 59th National Art Exhibition of Thailand; Second Prize Krung Thai Support Award 60th National Art Exhibition of Thailand, The Second Runner Up Award in Good Agriculture Good Kingdom Life Art Exhibition from Kasetsart University; First Runner Up Award 1st Krung Thai Bank Art Exhibition, Complimentary Award 2rd and 3rd White Elephant Art Exhibition, Bronze Medal Award” UOB Painting of the Year from UOB Bank.

This exhibition represents Seacourt’s commitment to raise the profile of contemporary printmaking by exhibiting high quality work by international artists. The exhibition opens on the 9th June and continues to the 22nd July. Gallery times 9.30-4.30 Monday – Friday. Saturdays by appointment

 

Eden's Blueprint at Clotworthy House, Antrim

Angela Darby 'Fantaheadz Kingdom' Archival Inkjet

Angela Darby 'Fantaheadz Kingdom' Archival Inkjet

Eden's Blueprint, an exhibition of original prints inspired by the historic site of Antrim Castle, will open on the 5th June at the Oriel Gallery and continue through July. This partnership project is with Clotworthy House Art Centre in Antrim. Antrim Castle Gardens are of the most unique and historically intact gardens in the UK and throughout Ireland. The former seat of the Skeffington family, Viscounts Massereene and Ferrard, Antrim Castle occupied its imposing setting on the banks of the Sixmilewater River since 1610. The family began laying out the gardens in the 17th century. While the castle itself was destroyed by fire in 1922 the principal Anglo-Dutch water features of the gardens, though somewhat neglected, have remained largely intact. These unique historic gardens, located close to Antrim town centre, recently underwent a major programme of works to restore many of the key features dating back to the late 17th century. The Heritage Lottery Fund’s recognition of Antrim Castle Garden’s historical significance provided the impetus for Antrim Borough Council to undertake what was the biggest garden restoration project seen in Northern Ireland.

Original Prints at Belfast International Airport

Dine Tsosi, last of the Navajo war chiefs. Courtesy of Arizona State University and St. Michaels Mission and the Province of Our Lady of Guadalupe of the Order of Friars Minor  

Dine Tsosi, last of the Navajo war chiefs. Courtesy of Arizona State University and St. Michaels Mission and the Province of Our Lady of Guadalupe of the Order of Friars Minor

 

Over the next year Belfast International Airport is hosting a series of exhibitions of original prints created by members of Seacourt: The Centre for Contemporary Printmaking. Commencing with 'Response', which presents images inspired by a collection of photographs documenting Native Americans from 1902, the venue will enable 4,000,000 visitors per year to experience original prints.

Robert Peters, Seacourt's Creative Director said, "This is a fantastic opportunity for our members to share their prints with a large audience. Seacourt has a strong record of exhibiting art in non gallery settings, but this expands our audience to undreamt of proportions. I would like to thank Belfast International Airport, particularly Human Resources Manager Jaclyn Coulter,  for this support in bringing visual art to new audiences"

Following on from 'Response'  a partnership project with Clotworthy House Arts Centre, Antrim 'Eden's Blueprint' will run to November. In January a new body of prints based on a theme suggested by Belfast International Airport will be launched.

Seacourt Forges New International Links

Mervi Viitajylha, Christine Jalio and Susanna Shearman

Mervi Viitajylha, Christine Jalio and Susanna Shearman

Three artists have travelled from Finland to take part in Seacourt’s first interdisciplinary residency. Susanna Shearman (writer), Christine Jalio (jeweller) and Mervi Viitajylha (set designer/prop maker) will be in Bangor from 17 - 25 May to work on a film exploring cultural responses to bereavement and grieving. They are hoping that local people will be willing to assist by providing them with objects of sentimental value and the stories behind them to include in the film. All objects will be returned of course.

Robert Peters, Seacourt’s Creative Director said, “It’s really wonderful to have artists from outside the UK choose to visit our facility based on our growing, international reputation as a printmaking resource. By including other disciplines in our residency programme we hope to foster a deeper understanding of the creative process by gaining an insight into how other arts professionals develop their artworks and explore themes. The interesting aspect of this project is its collaborative nature. It will be fascinating to see how the three artists bring their individual skills to bear on a shared outcome. ”

Seacourt prides itself on its international relationships and has added Finland to existing links with Arizona, Washington DC and New Zealand. Several Seacourt members will take part in residencies at Cultural Centre Vanha Paukku, Finland this year.  Seacourt’s Self Arranged Residencies are interdisciplinary and welcome artists across all art forms. This month lithographer Joseph Sores will visit from New Orleans and in August Brian D Cohen will visit from Washington State. Dominic Valencia will visit from Arizona for two months beginning in September. Currently an exhibition of small prints by 233 artists from 30 countries is being exhibited at The Centre for Contemporary Printmaking in Balloo Industrial Units. This International Mini Print Biennial continues to the 27th May. The gallery is open Monday to Friday 9.30 – 4.30 daily. Saturday access can be arranged by appointment.

For further details contact info@seacourt-ni.org.uk or 02891460595.

 

Parisian Printmakers visit Seacourt

Alice Gauthier and Rob Miles

Alice Gauthier and Rob Miles

Two artists have travelled from Paris to spend three weeks at Seacourt: The Centre for Contemporary Printmaking in Bangor. Rob Miles and fellow lithographer Alice Gauthier spent their time creating a new collection of original prints. The visit took place as part of Seacourt’s Self Arranged Residency initiative which allows professional printmakers access the widest range of print techniques in Ireland in exchange for a talk and workshop.

Robert Peters, Seacourt’s Creative Director said, “It’s really wonderful to have artists from outside the UK choose to visit our facility based on our growing, international reputation. Rob and Alice are very talented artists who graciously shared their knowledge of lithography with our members. We are sure these cultural exchange opportunities support our members in learning new techniques and developing their skills. Rob and Alice’s visit was also timely in that in coincided with our International Mini Print Biennial, which contains 233 original prints by artists from 30 countries. This exhibition gives the public a rare opportunity to experience printmaking on a global scale. ”

Seacourt’s Self Arranged Residencies are interdisciplinary and welcome artists across all art forms. This month there will be visits by Susanna Shearman a writer, Christine Jiallo a jeweller and Mervi Viitajylhä a puppeteer; all from Finland. Also in May, lithographer Joseph Shores will visit from New Orleans will visit. During August Brian D Cohen from Vermont will be here and in September Dominic Valencia from Arizona will be at Seacourt for two months.

 

INTERNATIONAL MINI PRINT BIENNIAL 14 APRIL - 20 MAY

miniprint.jpg

An exhibition of original prints by 233 artists from 30 countries opens its doors on Thursday 14th in Seacourt: The Centre for Contemporary Printmaking , Bangor at 7.00pm. The exhibition is the 2nd International Mini Print Biennial to be held at the world renowned artist resource and offers visitors a real insight into the art of printmaking across the globe.

Seacourt’s Creative Director, Robert Peters said, “We have had an outstanding response to our Mini Print Biennial this year. Participating artists have increased by almost 100 on our previous exhibition two years ago. We have received high quality etchings, lithographs and relief prints from skilled printmakers from many countries including a number from Iran for the first time. We would encourage everyone to take this opportunity to visit our gallery to experience this astounding collection of original prints”.

For this exhibition artists were asked to create an original print on a piece of 20cm x 20 cm paper exploring any theme and using any printmaking technique.  Original prints are made by hand, using processes that have a long history within art traditions. As part of this exhibition, Robert Peters will be demonstrating Salt Etching on Friday 15th April at 2.00. The exhibition continues to the 20th May. For further details contact Seacourt on 92460595 or email info@seacourt-ni.org.uk

Aaron Muncaster 10Feb - 26Mar

Aaron Muncaster, screenprint

Muncaster explores Portraiture as an historically prevalent art form. By creating multi layered screen prints of characters from popular culture he seeks to question assumptions of high and low art forms within the visual arts. He acknowledges the double interpretation of super hero comics as both social comment and pulp trash. Muncaster also plays with the significance of titles in our reading of the image, suggesting that text may have more power than the visual within a culture that promotes and extols a purely academic understanding of culture.  

Whence He Came 10th February - 26th March

Image: Clinton Kirkpatrick, White's Castle, woodcut 2015

Image: Clinton Kirkpatrick, White's Castle, woodcut 2015

This two person exhibition presents original relief prints by Northern Irish artist Clinton Kirkpatrick and Kenyan artist John Silver Kimani .

Kirkpatrick’s work draws inspiration from personal experiences, mythic narratives and the necessity of finding autonomy within a restrictive society. The artist is interested in strategies employed by those living outside societal norms to live authentic lives in spite of enforced limitations. He devises fictional characters through which to explore real issues using the idiom of storytelling to frame his investigations. He incorporates humour and playfulness as a means of engaging the audience in issues of importance without resorting to didactics. . Drawing is an instrumental part of his practice as it demonstrates cohesion with the various ways that he currently makes work.
Clinton Kirkpatrick currently lives and works in Belfast and Bangor. He completed a BA Hons: Painting and Drawing at the University of Huddersfield in 2008 and is currently a member of Seacourt: The Centre for Contemporary Printmaking. During a 2012 residency in Kenya he was introduced to the art of woodcut printmaking from John Silver Kimani and this relationship underpins the basis for the joint exhibition.

John Silver Kimani’s practice draws inspiration from the Kenyan environment and folk life. He incorporates these observations with influences from surrealism to create images loaded with personal symbolism.
In 2015 John Silver was awarded a solo exhibition at the Yokohama Museum of Art in Japan in 2016. He has exhibited extensively in Kenya, Africa, Europe, USA and Asia in both solo and group exhibitions. His woodcut prints and paintings are represented in the collections several institutions including the Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Silver was a founding member of the Banana Hill Art Studio. 

Exhibition continues to the 26th March

 

Clinton Kirkpatrick, Butterfly Crossing the Road, woodcut 2015

Clinton Kirkpatrick, Butterfly Crossing the Road, woodcut 2015

John Silver Kimani, The Lake of Happiness, woodcut 

John Silver Kimani, The Lake of Happiness, woodcut